A woman breathing in.

Breathing Problems

Breathing Exercises


Body Part:
Chest

Equipment:
Osteopressure Tool

Level:
Beginner

Roland Liebscher-Bracht in a white shirt is kindly smiling.

Roland Liebscher-Bracht

Germany’s most trusted pain specialist

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Roland Liebscher-Bracht is performing a pain-free exercise.

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Do You Have Troubles Breathing? Try These Exercises

We all do it. Yet, most of us do it wrong: breathing. Our body is built to excel well when we exert ourselves. For example, when we work out, our breathing quickens and deepens in order for the organism to take in more oxygen, which is essential for our body functions. Yet, nowadays, the lives we lead are less hectic, less action-packed, and more relaxed. Often we perform the same actions and movements each day, every day, with little to no variation. As we get used to this, so does our body — and our breathing. We barely use the muscles responsible to breathe in and out deeply, so they weaken. Our respiration becomes shallow and we supply our body with less oxygen. It’s time to change that, don’t you think?

In our video, Roland Liebscher-Bracht explains how breathing works, what we’re doing wrong, and shows you ways to fix it. Train your body to breathe better with our exercises and you’ll notice how refreshing it is to take a deep breath.

 In the following, we’ll show you two breathing exercises with which you can train your diaphragm. If you do the exercises regularly and consistently, your breathing might improve in the long term.

The third exercise involves our osteopressure technique, which requires you to press certain spots on your body to relieve acute pain within minutes. Here you can relax your diaphragm should you be in pain.

Roland Liebscher-Bracht is performing a pain-free exercise.

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All gain. No pain.

Roland Liebscher-Bracht is performing a pain-free exercise.

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Roland Liebscher-Bracht is exercising.

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Step 1 — Breathing Techniques


A woman is breathing through her diaphragm.

Exercise 1

For this exercise, you want to lie down on a mat, the floor or your bed. Since it takes almost no effort, you can easily do this breathing training before getting up or going to sleep.

Place one hand on your stomach and the other on your chest. Now you just breathe in and out. While you inhale deeply, your stomach should rise. When you exhale, your stomach flattens. Repeat this exercise as often as you want and possibly every day. This way, you train yourself to breathe deeply through the diaphragm.

 

A woman is exhaling.

Exercise 2

Sit down on a chair. Breathe in and out as deeply and steadily as possible. Then exhale. Empty your lungs completely.

A woman sits on the chair. She is leaning her head and neck forward with her hair falling down, while a man holds her by the shoulder.

Once there is no air left, bend forward and exhale again.

A woman is pinching her nose.

Then pinch your nose and sit up straight. Now keep sucking in and blowing out the air, but don’t remove your fingers! By doing this, you create a vacuum that stretches your diaphragm.

Repeat this exercise as often as you can but be careful! It’s best to remove any dangerous objects around you, just to be safe in case you get dizzy and lightheaded.

Tip: Alternatively, you may do this exercise while lying on your back.

Step 2 — Osteopressure


A woman is osteopressing herself.

For this exercise you’ll need our osteopressure tool with the conical handle and the pointy bit or alternatively a cork stopper that you whittle until it’s pointy.

Look for the end of the sternum, where you can still feel the extension of it. Place the tip of the Pain Releaser to the right of this spot, ideally close to the bone. Be careful though, the area is usually very sensitive.

Keep pressing until the pain there subsides and your diaphragm relaxes. Do not use too much force though!

Roland Liebscher-Bracht is performing a pain-free exercise.

Fight Pain with Information.

Get pain management videos and articles delivered right to your inbox by signing up for our free weekly newsletter.

All gain. No pain.

Roland Liebscher-Bracht is performing a pain-free exercise.

Fight pain with information by signing up for our free weekly newsletter.

Roland Liebscher-Bracht is exercising.

Fight pain with information by signing up for our free weekly newsletter.

Liebscher & Bracht's Five Pillars of Practice


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