A man with torticollis

 

Torticollis Treatment


Body Part:
Neck

Equipment:
Mini Foam Roller & Osteopressure Tool

Level:
Beginner

Roland Liebscher-Bracht in a white shirt is kindly smiling.

Roland Liebscher-Bracht

Germany’s trusted pain specialist

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Time for a Reality Neck: This Torticollis Treatment Relieves Neck Pain and Restores Your Range of Motion

Your neck has important jobs to do. It supports your head, guards nerves that transmit information from your brain to the body, and makes the movement of your head possible so you can shake it ‘yes’ or ‘no’. Torticollis (also known as wryneck) is a condition that affects the muscles of your neck, causing them to become twisted and tilted. It limits your ability to move your head, severely restricts or eliminates your range of motion, and your neck can’t do its jobs well.

If your head slants at an angle, appears twisted to one side, or your chin rests in an abnormal position, you may have torticollis. Other signs of torticollis include acute pain when moving your head or neck, stiff neck, tender neck muscles, neck muscle cramps, pain in your shoulders, back, or spine, and headache.

Although the cause of torticollis is often unknown, it can be brought on by bending or twisting your neck beyond its natural range of motion, sleeping in a position that doesn’t support proper spinal alignment, neck muscle spasms or shrunken muscles, or a herniated disc. An injury to the neck can also cause torticollis. 

We’ve developed a torticollis treatment that can relieve pain and restore your range of motion so you can shake your head ‘yes’ or ‘no’ with ease. All you need is our mini foam roller and osteopressure tool with the conical handle. Our treatment is aimed at torticollis, but it can be used against general stiff neck as well.

Check out our YouTube video below or scroll down to get step-by-step instructions on how to perform our torticollis treatment.

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Torticollis Treatment Part 1


Ina demonstrates a foam rolling massage for torticollis.

Exercise 1: Neck Foam Rolling Massage

    For this exercise, you’ll need our mini foam roller.

    • Sit back on your heels.
    • Turn your head 45° to the left and tilt it down.
    • Place the mini foam roller just under the small bone protruding behind your earlobe.
    • Apply enough pressure to the mini foam roller so that you reach between 8 and 9 on your personal pain scale.
    • Roll slowly and forcefully downward in the direction of your shoulder. Remember to maintain consistent pressure.
    • Roll for about 1 minute and stop when you reach your shoulder blade.
    • Repeat on the other side.
    Ina's head is visible. Under her head lies an osteopressure tool. She holds the tool with her right hand.

    Exercise 2: Neck Osteopressure Treatment

    For this exercise, you’ll need our osteopressure tool with the conical handle and the flat attachment. We recommend starting with the soft attachment and increasing the hardness level when you’re ready.

    • Lie on the floor.
    • At the base of your skull, you’ll find a small protruding bone in the middle. Place the osteopressure tool in the hollow just below the bone.
    • The weight of your head should provide enough pressure so that you are between 8 and 9 on your personal pain scale. If you need to increase the pressure, press your palm against your forehead.
    • Hold for about 1 minute.
    • Move the osteopressure tool to the left into the curve at the edge of your skull.
    • Apply enough pressure so that you are between 8 and 9 on your personal pain scale.
    • Hold for about 1 minute.
    • Move the osteopressure tool further to the left so that it’s next to the small bone protruding behind your earlobe. 
    • Apply enough pressure so that you are between 8 and 9 on your personal pain scale.
    • Hold for about 1 minute.
    • Repeat on the two points opposite.
    • Finish.
    Ina demonstrates a stretch for torticollis.

    Exercise 3: Side Stretch

    • Sit back on your heels with a straight back.
    • Turn your head 45° to the right.
    • Pull your right shoulder down by making a right-handed fist and bringing it to your shoulder.
    • Place your left hand on the right side of your head above your ear.
    • Pull your head down so you feel a stretch along the right side of your neck.
    • On each exhale, increase the intensity of the stretch until you reach between 8 and 9 on your personal pain scale.
    • Hold for between 2 and 2.5 minutes.
    • Repeat on the other side.

    Torticollis Treatment Part 2


    Ina demonstrates a stretch for torticollis.

    Extension Exercise 1

    • Sit back on your heels.
    • Slowly tilt your head forward. Focus on stretching the back of your neck and elongating your spine.
    • On each exhale, intensify the stretch by bringing your head down further.
    • When you reach between 8 and 9 on your personal pain scale, hold for about 1 minute.
    • Slowly bring your head back to a neutral position.
    • Pull your chin straight back as far as you can. Be mindful that you aren’t pushing your chest forward
    • On each exhale, pull your chin up until you are facing the ceiling. You should feel a stretch along the front of your neck.
    • Hold for about 1 minute.
    • Finish by slowly bringing your head back to a neutral position.
    Ina's head and upper body are visible. She pulls her right bent arm downward and makes a fist.
    Ina demonstrates a stretch for torticollis.

    Extension Exercise 2

    • Tilt your head to the left. You should feel a stretch along the right side of your neck to your shoulder.
    • Intensify the stretch by making a right-handed fist, bringing it to your shoulder and pulling down.
    • On each exhale, intensify the stretch by tilting your head further to the left and pulling your shoulder down.
    • When you’ve reached between 8 and 9 on your personal pain scale, hold the stretch for about 1 minute.
    • Finish by slowly coming back to a neutral position.
    • Repeat on the other side.

    Extension Exercise 3

    • Sit back on your heels.
    • Pull your shoulders down by making a fist with each hand and bringing them to their respective shoulders.
    • Slowly turn your head as far as you can to the left, then to the right. Repeat 3 times.
    • Come back to a neutral position.
    • Tilt your head forward and back quickly. Repeat 4 times. 
    • Come back to a neutral position.
    • Turn your head 45° to the left. Keeping your shoulders down, tilt your head back and forth along an angle 3 times.
    • Repeat on the other side.
    • Finish by shaking your head and shoulders.
    neck in regularly

    To get your neck in shape and keep it in shape, put yourself on a schedule. Perform our torticollis treatment 6 days a week for 3 weeks. You’ll feel the difference when you turn your head to look out the window.

    our tip

    Try sleeping without a pillow for a week or two. Our heads love puffy pillows, but our spines don’t. Pillows that elevate your head too high from your mattress contribute to spinal misalignment and may bring on a stiff neck.

    Fight Pain with Information.

    Roland Liebscher-Bracht is performing a pain-free exercise.

    Subscribe to The Pain Relief Advisor

    Sign up for our free newsletter and discover how to manage your pain yourself. Every two weeks, we’ll deliver follow-along videos and articles to your inbox.

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